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Timothy Nevaquaya

 

Comanche

 

Tim Tate Nevaquaya has spent many years working to develop his own artistic style.

Given that his father was the noted and acclaimed Comanche artist and flutist, Doc Tate Nevaquaya, (who painted in the style, art critics refer to as “Oklahoma flat style”—two-dimensional Native American art whose origins go back to the Kiowa Five artists, who began painting in the 1920’s and brought Native art into the contemporary era), he has had a huge creative shadow to contend with and emerge from.

“I learned that traditional technique from my father. About a decade ago I had a real creative breakthrough, where I found myself literally up all night, exploring a more abstracted point of view”  “The more I explored, the more came through in regards to color and design.” “I felt these were the most interesting and beautiful pieces I’d done.”  “It’s strongly expressive,” Tim says about his paintings, which rely heavily on oil as a medium.

 

It’s not as academic as the traditionalists, although it takes facets of the Native American culture and expresses it in a way that really conveys a very deep spiritual message to the viewer.” “I certainly feel I found my own vision as a painter – this work is born from deep soul-searching and experimentation.”

 

His father, Doc Tate Nevaquaya was largely responsible for the revival of the Plains Indian Flute, which Tim plays beautifully. The peaceful and calming melody of his playing draws you into his paintings as if you were there, too.